What is Digital Sharecropping and Why is It a Threat?

Sometimes, you can’t help but feel a little smug about your online presence that we rant out the websites that show your content, even the social media sites where we have outstanding shares and search engines that rank us high. Aside from the fact that those sites and platforms share our content and the astounding way they propagate our content, it’s an excellent way to show our superiority. But do you stop to think of the side effects of your tenancy on those borrowed locations?

Okay, so before we discuss the risks of sharecropping, let’s first acknowledge the positive effects of these platforms marketing your content. First of all, they benefit us by making both your brand and your content “web-hold” names. However, you can’t deny that there really is a reason for you to worry about what could happen to those hours you spent writing really good content, not to mention the financial resources you invest on all the necessary researches. Indeed, sharecropping demands some pondering.

Perhaps we need to explain the agricultural concept that is sharecropping. It is when a tent is allowed to farm on a landowner’s piece of land and gets a share of the crops in exchange. In this arrangement, the landlord is at the better end while the tenant exerts effort with very little to show for it. There are, of course, some negative factors like high interest rates, bad weather, and unpredictable harvests that could greatly affect the tenant.

Now let us just transfer that same concept to content marketing. Digital sharecropping is when you create your content and put them up on social networks or sites that are owned by someone else and you don’t receive direct compensation for them. What you might not realize at the moment is how the contents that you created changes ownership once they are posted on someone else’s website or social media.

Each day, we come across an abundance of great content on Facebook, Google, Pinterest, and more. But we rarely realize that those posts we find are actually the work of others who get no credit for them.

Let’s set aside all the good things for now – the great user experience, better accessibility, and the positive effect on online traffic. Let’s focus a bit on how sharecropping can affect our contents in the future and how you’re at a risk of heavily depending on other businesses.

You should not be comfortable with the idea of solely depending on platforms owned by others to propagate your business! Or have you forgotten about platforms like MySpace that used to be the main thing but is now little more than a nostalgic idea? Such platforms do not bring traffic the way they used to. Because they are not as vibrant as they used to be, the content we posted on them, too, could very well be buried until (hopefully) someone unearths them. Who can tell whether or not our favourite social media platforms today, as well as the websites we trust at present will continue to be relevant for many years, right? All we can do is hope.

The bottom line is, shared content can easily lose fertility in the long run and while social media platforms and other websites can significantly help your business, you should not forget that having your own website and working on it really hard means you get to enjoy the success of your content and employ the strategies you deem necessary to stay relevant.

You can gain independence from sharecropping when you have a well-designed website that is truly yours. An opt-in email list is also a good idea.

Of course, having your own domain name lends a more professional appeal to your business. We can help you become a web-landlord! Reach out to ReferLinks Online Marketing and you can be sure that your valuable content is yours to build success on!